Some Examples of Veterinary Emergencies:
  • If an animal is lying around unresponsive.
  • Difficult and labored breathing.
  • Suddenly falling and not being able to move around.
  • Acute bleeding, wounds, fractures.
  • Hypothermia, i.e. decreased body temperature. Pet's body is cold.
  • Hyperthermia, i.e. increased body temperature, as in heat stroke.
  • Excessive drooling, choking, severe coughing with phlegm and foam production.
  • Extreme lethargy, weakness.
  • Pale mucus membranes, yellow mucus membranes, yellow skin: any one of these conditions may indicate an emergency situation.
  • Seizures.
  • Ingestion of household chemicals or other hazardous items ( visit the Animal Poison Control website for a complete listing of pet hazards: www.aspca.org/apcc )
  • Extremely bloated belly.
  • Unable to urinate despite trying. Blood in urine. Unable to defecate despite trying.
  • Hit by car/vehicles. Even if you do not notice outward abnormality, the pet should be checked for shock and inner bleeding, and may be given anti-shock medicines to prevent shock and PVCs (a kind of heart attack that can happen within 48 hours of blunt trauma).
Eye Emergencies: Extremely painful eye(s), pink/red eye(s), sensitive to light, bulging of the eyeball are some of the signs that indicate that your pet may need emergency care.
Reaction to drugs / vaccinations / injections:
Breathing difficulty, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, rash on face and skin including facial swelling. Contact nearest animal hospital/animal emergency clinic ASAP.
 
Emergencies and what to do about them
We at CLARK ANIMAL HOSPITAL are open 8 AM to 7 PM, Mon. to Friday and 8 AM to 4 PM on Saturdays. You are welcome to call us in these hours for emergency help. (732) 388-3379.
Absolute emergency cases like Asthma attack, open mouth breathing, etc. are required to call in advance to make sure a veterinarian will be available right away. Other emergencies that do not pose danger of quick/imminent death can come in without calling in advance.
After hours (when we are closed) we recommend that you take your pet to your nearest 24/7 Veterinary Emergency Facility.
 
Pet First Aid Kit Check List
Accidents and natural disasters happen. Be prepared for emergencies involving your pet with a Pet First Aid Kit. A Pet First Aid Kit can be used for medical emergencies prior to receiving the professional care of a veterinarian. Keep a first aid kit handy in your home and car. A Pet Emergency Kit contains:
 
  • 1 Bandage, Cohesive 2" X 5 yds (Compares To Vet Wrap)
  • 10 Bandages, Plastic 1" X 3"
  • 1 Burn Gel 3.5g Packet
  • 1 Cold Pack, Instant 4" X 6"
  • 1 Emergency Blanket, Aluminized
  • 2 Eye/SkinWash, Sterile 15 ml Solution
  • 30 Gauze Pads 2" X 2" Non-Sterile
 
  • 10 Gauze Pads Sterile; [(5) 2" X 2" and (5) 3" X 3"]
  • 1 Gauze Roll, Conforming, 2" X 4.1 yds
  • 4 Gloves, Vinyl (Medical Grade)
  • 2 Hydrogen Peroxide 1 oz Packets
  • 1 Leash
  • 3 Lubricating Jelly Packets
  • 1 Oral Syringe - 10 cc
 
 
Emergency / Natural Disaster Preparation Check List
  • Pet Kit Copies of important documents for each pet (stored in a waterproof container)
  • Current medical records, including vaccinations
  • Veterinarian's contact information
  • Pet License information
  • Feeding instructions (in case another person takes care of your pets)
  • Pet medications (2 week supply) with dosage information, replace when expired
  • Leash, and collar or harness for each pet
  • Identification and microchip tags on all collars and harnesses (contact the microchip registry and make sure your information is current)
  • Current photographs and written physical descriptions of each pet, including species, breed, age, sex, color, and characteristic markings (include yourself in some of the photographs to help provide proof of ownership
  • Water (3 day supply: a pet up to 10 lbs. needs 1 quart of water for 3 days, a 40 lb. dog needs 1 gallon of water for 3 days, an 80 lb. dog needs 2 gallons of water for 3 days)
  • Food (2 week supply), replace when expired
  • Bowls for food and water, no-spill bowls preferable
  • Can opener, manual (for wet food)
  • Spoon (for wet food)
  • Extra towels and blankets
  • Pet first aid kit
  • Pet beds
  • Pet toys
  • Paper towels
  • Bleach for use as a cleaning solution. Household chlorine bleach can be used as a disinfectant (dilute nine parts water to one part bleach).
  • Plastic bags, for pet waste
  • Trash bags
For each dog:
Dog kennel or collapsible cage large enough to hold two dishes and allow the dog to sleep comfortably (your contact information should be clearly labeled on each kennel)
For each cat:
  • Small bag of cat litter, litter scoop, and a small litterbox
  • Sturdy carrier large enough to hold two dishes and a small litterbox and still allow the cat to sleep comfortable (your contact information should be clearly labeled on each kennel)
 
 
AFTER HOUR EMERGENCIES
If we are closed, please call your nearest 24/7 Veterinary Emergency Facility or Garden State Veterinary Emergency Services in Iselin, NJ at (732) 283-3535.
CLARK ANIMAL HOSPITAL is open 8 a.m. - 7 p.m., Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Saturday. You are always welcome to call us at (732) 388-3379 or walk-in during these hours for any emergency help.
HOW DO I KNOW IF MY PET IS HAVING AN EMERGENCY?
An emergency is defined as any medical situation in which the animal needs immediate veterinary intervention, and where without such intervention the animal may deteriorate rapidly and may even die.
 
Sick Pets - Animal Hospital in Rahway, NJ
 
Some Examples of Veterinary Emergencies:
  • If an animal is lying around unresponsive.
  • Difficult and labored breathing.
  • Suddenly falling and not being able to move around.
  • Acute bleeding, wounds, fractures.
  • Hypothermia, i.e. decreased body temperature. Pet's body is cold.
  • Hyperthermia, i.e. increased body temperature, as in heat stroke.
  • Excessive drooling, choking, severe coughing with phlegm and foam production.
  • Extreme lethargy, weakness.
  • Pale mucus membranes, yellow mucus membranes, yellow skin: any one of these conditions may indicate an emergency situation.
  • Seizures.
  • Ingestion of household chemicals or other hazardous items ( visit the Animal Poison Control website for a complete listing of pet hazards: www.aspca.org/apcc )
  • Extremely bloated belly.
  • Unable to urinate despite trying. Blood in urine. Unable to defecate despite trying.
  • Hit by car/vehicles. Even if you do not notice outward abnormality, the pet should be checked for shock and inner bleeding, and may be given anti-shock medicines to prevent shock and PVCs (a kind of heart attack that can happen within 48 hours of blunt trauma).
Eye Emergencies:
Extremely painful eye(s), pink/red eye(s), sensitive to light, bulging of the eyeball are some of the signs that indicate that your pet may need emergency care.
Reaction to drugs / vaccinations / injections:
Breathing difficulty, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, rash on face and skin including facial swelling. Contact nearest animal hospital/animal emergency clinic ASAP.